Everything The New York Times Had "On The Back Burner" Last Year


Mid-East peace.
The China-Japan Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands dispute.
Diabetes.
A desire for a Manhattan apartment.
Living in New York.
The European bank crisis.
A personal dream of opening a Mediterranean restaurant.
Unsolved cases of lost New York cell phones.
Climate change for Republicans.
Equity for Libyan women.
American social issues.
Playwright Jon Fosse’s career.
Carrots.
The Aquada, an amphibious sports car.
Quota reform at the IMF to alleviate Eurocentrism.
A dictum that interior designer David Wiseman once heard: ‘Ask the material what it would like to be.’
A plan to install a floating shelf.
What to do with the millions of Palestinians.
Novak Djokovic.
Palestinian national ambitions.
FEMA’s relief effort in Prattsvile, N.Y, after tropical storm Irene.
The Palestinian issue.
The financial negotiations of Premier League soccer club Paris Saint-Germain.
A case of H.I.V.
U.S. foreign policy.
Human rights in Russia.
The reform of Spain’s rigid labour market.
One man’s songwriting and music practice.
A skier’s training regimen.
Golf.
The Nagorno-Karabakh talks between Russia and Georgia.
Barack Obama’s foreign policy, according to Mitt Romney.
For one restaurateur, everything but work.
Seinfeld.
Cooking a hot breakfast each day for your children.
The problem of population decline in southern and eastern Europe.
H.I.V.
Illegal immigration in Arizona.
A woman’s health.
The main quest in the video game, Reckoning.
European finances.


This list is made up of all the issues, people and desires that The New York Times reported as being on the “back burner” over the past year, from Jan. 23, 2012 to Jan. 23, 2013.


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Moez Surani is the author of two poetry collections, Reticent Bodies and Floating Life. His writing has won the Chalmers Arts Fellowship, the Kingston Literary Award and the Antigonish Review’s Poetry Prize. He lives in Toronto. Photo by Wei Ming, via Shutterstock.