Wednesday, March 16th, 2011
15

How To Share Big Files

Try to attach a file that's 25 megabytes or bigger to an outgoing Gmail message and what do you get? I have no idea, because I would never attempt such a stunt, but I'm guessing it's a friendly error message informing you that the raw video trailer for your documentary about paperclips is the digital equivalent of a wide-load trailer and unfit for this particular mode of travel. What now? You've tried everything! Except no, you haven't.

For starters, if you're teaming up on this groundbreaking documentary of yours, and need to share the material with a partner 3000 miles away so they can edit and play around with it on their own, then might I suggest taking a look at the menu atop of the Gmail screen called "Documents"? This is a nifty little tool that allows you to upload files to a cloud (not literally a cloud, relax), from which they can be plucked by anyone you want to grant access.

Read the rest here.

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15 Comments / Post A Comment

HiredGoons (#603)

My documentary about huffing dry-erase markers is going to trump your documentary about paperclips soooooo harrrrrrrrd.

gumplr (#66)

Clippit and Rip It: the Rise and Fall of America's First and Last Anthropomorphized Office Assistant

superdave (#8,972)

I was curious I googled Google Documents size liimits, and they allow up to 1 gig of space.

I'm a big fan of DropBox. It automatically syncs your DropBox folder across multiple computers and iDevices. No need to tell it to upload or anything. Anytime anything changes in the folder it gets synced.

Box.net looks interesting. It does give you more space than DropBox, although it doesn't look as seemless with the free account.

darkheather (#10,075)

That's 1G total. Individual file limits are 10MB (as I learned the hard way yesterday.)

So trying to share 25MB file via Google Docs? Not going to work.

(Caveat: the 10MB limit applied to PPT docs, although I would be really surprised if limits were different excel docs.)

superdave (#8,972)

Here's what Google Docs says:

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-d-method-advances-electrically-small.html

1 meg for Word, 400,000 cells for Excel, 10 meg for PPT. Other files can be anything up to 1 gig.

NinetyNine (#98)

Oh my, your file is so large. There's no way it will fit in my box. What will I do? [fans self]

Art Yucko (#1,321)

"extract all"

Matt (#26)

10.0 Best New Most-Read

caw_caw (#5,641)

Someone else is already doing a paperclip documentary.
JUST GREAT.
Back to the drawing board.

kneetoe (#1,881)

How about a drawing board documentary???

janeminty (#9,376)

I recently researched this for sending files under 2GB (assuming you can't use ftp for some reason). I tested upload/download speeds, ability to continue after a dropped connection, bandwidth allowance, storage, ease for non-technically inclined clients, and paid account commitment durations. My only and big issue with Dropbox was the abysmal upload speed (even after prefs adjustment). Yousendit and Dropsend seemed to be best overall.

I literally just got something shared with me (jealous?) from a site called mailbigfile.com. I don't know anything about it, except it wins the award for Most Obvious Name.

(Also Miles, you're much better looking than that photo of you Over There suggests.)

Miles Klee (#3,657)

Apparently I will never live down that week I had a vyou account.

We actually use Google Apps at work, so I can attest to the power of Google Docs.

I can also attest to it sometimes mangling your formatting, so watch out.

ALSO! Don't feel the need to deprive yourself of the tactical nuke that is the Mail Bomb. Sometimes it's just so delicious.

kpants (#719)

Mediafire is handy, except when it isn't. I've had it mangle downloads every so often (dropped or corrupted data, etc.) That, and I've discovered that some folks' firewalls/antivirus software decides to declare that site dangerous and/or won't let them access it. Yousendit is actually a little more useful, though it's download speeds seem to be overall slower.

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