The Songs of the Subway

A year of subway sights and sounds.
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Moments from True Detective Season 2 Episode 3, Ranked

CIxuA0CWgAEGpbV.jpg-large12. Man rips out another man’s grill, because “what kind of way is that to greet the world.”

11. Second plotline about male fertility emerges.

10. Man has trophy wife who is twenty-two, foreign, cuts out pictures from magazines, wears formal dress and vapes all day.

9. Man has son who cultivates a deep tan, close cropped hair, and “urban” accent for his Rachel Dolezal act

8. Man says, “Yeah, I’m a set photographer”—*takes pictures of mostly naked women in costume*—”best use of my time so far.”

7. Man says of a non-lethal gunshot wound, “Took one in the sternum, so my heart aches.”

6. Man tells man maybe his father made him nervous because he “lacked grit.”

4. Man is too distraught to be aroused by a blow job, which has “never happened to him in his fuckin’ life.”

3. Female superior says to her female employee of her male colleague, “I’m not saying ‘fuck him,’ but maybe let him think you might fuck him.”

2. Man drinks water: “Booze tends to take the edge off; I want to stay angry.”

1. Man tells another man he won’t be able to progress in his work with “this angsty cop drama you’re rolling.”

Kids Are Using Minecraft To Design A More Sustainable World#

Heathered Pearls, "Warm Air Estate (ft. Outerbridge)"


I don’t want to get back to real life any more than you do (probably less, even, because real life is just harder for me than it is for anyone else) but no matter how I try I cannot figure out a way to make the weekend last a little longer, so since we have to go back in anyway we may as well go back in gently. This should help.

LaCroix Sparkling Water Flavors, Ranked

16870305933_484f7cf429_z12. Peach-Pear
11. Lime
10. Lemon
9. Orange
8. Cran-Raspberry
7. Passionfruit
6. Pure
5. Berry
4. Coconut
3. Mango
2. Apricot
1. Pamplemousse




Photo by Tony Webster

The Songs of the Subway

album cover guy

accordian lorimer

New York City, July 1, 2015

weather review sky 070115★★★ It was impossible afterward to remember in what order things had even happened: the flash-flood warning blaring on the phone in the dark, the purple stroke of lightning so bright it shone through the blinds, the bursts of rain clashing against the windows like gravel. By the groggy morning all that was left was dampness and muck, thick air and thin sun. People steered around puddles on the Park walkways. Shiny confetti lay submerged on the sidewalk downtown. All day the clouds were like a finger on a hair dryer’s trigger button, cutting the heat off and turning it on again. The sun went down with cotton-print stripes behind it, cheerful and harmless.

The Workers Behind WeWork

2015-07-01 16.15.34Two weeks ago, office cleaners at WeWork locations throughout New York City began protesting unjust working conditions. WeWork is an international co-working startup recently valued at ten billion dollars that is based in New York, where it is, by footprint, reportedly the fastest growing company in the city. The janitorial staff at WeWork’s New York locations are demanding higher wages, benefits, and vacation time; they are also considering joining a union. On Wednesday, they, along with sympathetic union workers from 32BJ (the local chapter of the national Service Employees International Union), and a drum and bugle corps marched from one WeWork location, at 222 Broadway, near Fulton Center, to another, at the Charging Bull, in Bowling Green Park. Speeches were made; the band played; confused tourists looked on.

WeWork cleaners are not employed by the company, but by the Commercial Building Maintenance Corp., which is a non-union shop. They make eleven dollars an hour or less, without benefits; the prevailing wage in New York for union workers is twenty-three dollars an hour, with full benefits. According to 32BJ, ninety percent of commercial office cleaners in New York City—and ninety-eight percent in Manhattan—are unionized. Union members from 32BJ—which claims to be the country’s largest property service workers union, with a hundred and forty-five thousand members, including seventy thousand in New York City—leafleted outside WeWork locations in Boston, Washington, D.C., and Miami, where WeWork just opened. If CBM’s cleaners vote to unionize, they will likely join 32BJ. “Everybody wants to join the union,” Bolivar, a WeWork cleaner, told me.

Bolivar works the night shift at the WeWork space at 120 East 23rd Street. He and two other cleaners have five hours to clean the two kitchens, take out the garbage, mop the hallways, and dry mop the cubicle and office spaces. “We can’t do everything they want us to do,” he said. CBM also expects its employees to cover for absent co-workers whenever and wherever necessary, without paying overtime. “They love to add more work,” he said. For Bolivar, the organization effort is not only about fair compensation, “It’s respect that I would like.” Nobody inside WeWork has said anything to him about the union drive. “It’s business as usual,” Bolivar said.

The Country Bumpkin Circle of Life

I don’t drink, but if I did, then here’s what I’d say to every bartender in the county: “I’ll just have a glass of anything that’s cool.”

That’s my favorite drink order, and also my favorite pick-up line. It’s a gift Cal Smith gave to the world in 1974. The song was called “Country Bumpkin” and the album was audaciously titled It’s Not the Miles You’ve Traveled. Smith was already a superstar, and this single went into the world between “An Hour and a Six Pack” and “Between Lust and Watching TV.”

“Country Bumpkin” spent a few weeks on the country charts, and the song won Smith both an Academy of Country Music award and Country Music Association award. The quiet ballad of a bumpkin and a barmaid was also my favorite version of love for the first ten years or so of my life—two people who meet and make a family without much fuss. It’s an American love story: A man walked into a bar and “parked his lanky frame upon a tall bar stool” while “a bar room girl with hard and knowing eyes slowly looked him up and down.” Eyes and voices are all it takes to fall in love, and the man’s “long, slow southern drawl” does all the talking. Within a verse, the woman confesses, “I’ve seen some sights, but babe, you’re something.” And then Smith tells us “just a short year later” they’ve married and are welcoming a son into the world, the “cuddly boy child” laying on the woman’s chest while she looks down with “a raptured look of love and tenderness.”

If we really want to get America’s economy moving again we should arrange a prison break in every state.#

A Poem by sam sax

Theatre of the Absurd

if you put a bed on stage
you have a bedroom

if you put a sink & two chairs
you have a kitchen

what if there’s only a child
applying foundation to his pristine face

what do you have then?
when a person’s dead onstage

does the audience burn
the scenery or applaud?

does the lighting designer kill
all the lights? though the words

may be the playwright’s
the framework is the inferno’s

furnace dressed in her paper
paper gown. what if the child

disappears into wings
the curtain rising finds

no one left to applaud
what if the child learns

to dance, what if he can’t
my god, what if he tries to sing?