Posts Tagged: Journalismism
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The Legend of the Legend of Bunko Kelly, the Kidnapping King of Portland

In the late eighteen hundreds, the port cities of the American West were dangerous nests of sailors, prostitutes, and gangsters—none more so than Portland, Oregon. The most infamous relic of those bad old days are not the wooly beards of its male population, but the Portland Underground, the city’s network of so-called "shanghai tunnels," which tourists today are often told were used to spirit unsuspecting men, perhaps lured by a half-naked prostitute to an establishment where they were drugged and kidnapped, toward their final destination: pressed into service on a ship.

These kidnappers were known as crimps, and the "king of the crimps," according to folk legend, [...]

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Fun With New York Times Numbers

For all the cloudiness over the really real reasons that Jill Abramson was fired—because she was "brusque"! because she tried to secretly hire another co-managing editor to run digital! because her Times tattoo isn't large enough! not sexism!—there is at least one set of cold, hard data:

As executive editor, Abramson’s starting salary in 2011 was $475,000, compared to Keller’s salary that year, $559,000. Her salary was raised to $503,000, and—only after she protested—was raised again to $525,000. She learned that her salary as managing editor, $398,000, was less than that of the male managing editor for news operations, John Geddes. She also learned that her salary as [...]

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I Was A Teenaged Anchorman

It was a supply closet off the main classroom, six feet across, with the only wall decoration being a length of pine board with a row of nails sticking out. Because of the terrible noise inside, the door was always shut. The two machines, industrial-era things that clamored and shook, spewed out a steady stream of hurt and lies and death. On this San Diego afternoon I was in the little room with my coffee, going through the accumulated Associated Press and UPI news that had cranked out of the wire machines during lunch and whatever regular classes I might have attended that day. Local stories, national and international [...]

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Editor Quote Machines: Aaron Hicklin v. Dan Peres

Here is a Guy Trebay Times Style article about how all the young dudes are a little bit fat. He has two experts, both editors of magazines, who explain the phenomenon to us. One does a really good job? The other is ridiculous. · Aaron Hicklin, of Out: "I sort of think the six-pack abs obsession got so prissy it stopped being masculine." · Dan Peres, of Details: "If we had a slob in the White House, all the hipsters would turn into some walking Chippendales calendar."

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Everything You Have Needed to Know in 2014 (So Far)

Today, in the Washington Post, Eve Fairbanks asks: Could "all you need to know" be the most insidious, reductive, and lame story formula currently conquering our reading life? Everywhere you turn there’s another purported ne plus ultra explainer purporting to tell us "absolutely everything we could possibly need to know" about some current event, some curiosity of history, some deep mystery of life on Earth.

Good question! "All you need to know" can be distilled down further to the no-less-demanding formulation of "need to know." It's still just as chiding, just as exhaustive, just as needy, when you consider the full range of its implications: You are required [...]

2

"The Reasons for the Switch Were Not Immediately Clear"

Jill Abramson, the first female, and most tattooed, executive editor in New York Times history, is "unexpectedly leaving the position" after taking over in 2011. She is being replaced by a Dean Baquet, a guy who punched a wall.

Jill Abramson, abruptly stepping down as NYT editor in favor of managing editor Dean Baquet? Gotta be a back story there

— HowardKurtz (@HowardKurtz) May 14, 2014

Update: An alternate viable headline, courtesy of the reporting of Ken Auletta at The New Yorker Dot Com, could be "'Pushy' Woman Pushed Out":

Several weeks ago, I’m told, Abramson discovered that her pay and her pension benefits as [...]

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How To Fail At Journalism In Exotic Foreign Lands

Budapest had never been my favorite European capital, but a job in a foreign city is always better than a job wherever I happen to be living at the moment. This is why, on a balmy Southern California morning in February of 1996, I voluntarily carried my only possessions to Los Angeles International Airport's Tom Bradley terminal the customary three hours prior to departure. The first two hours passed pleasantly at the airport lounge, where my friend Steve and I drank double Greyhounds served in pint glasses.

The Double Greyhound is just a lot of vodka with grapefruit juice to soften the blow. We had been drinking these regularly in [...]

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New York Times Executive Editors Ranked, After Much Deliberation

8. Abraham Rosenthal (1977-1986)

7. Howell Raines (2001-2003)

6. Jill Abramson (2011-20141)

5. Bill Keller (2003-2011)


4. James Reston (1968-19692)


3. Turner Catledge (1964-1968)

2. Max Frankel (1986-1994)


1. Joseph Lelyveld (1994-2001)

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The Way Middle-Aged White Men Work Now

1.

Before he goes to sleep, between 11 and midnight, Dan Pfeiffer, the White House communications director, typically checks in by e-mail with the same reporter: Mike Allen of Politico, who is also the first reporter Pfeiffer corresponds with after he wakes up at 4:20. A hyperactive former Eagle Scout, Allen will have been up for hours, if he ever went to bed. Whether or not he did is one of the many little mysteries that surround him. The abiding certainty about Allen is that sometime between 5:30 and 8:30 a.m., seven days a week, he hits “send” on a mass e-mail newsletter that some of America’s most influential [...]

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Free Subway Rag Now Literally Destroying America

When we talk about the dangers of the degradation of newspapers, and the rise of "journalism products," such as the execrable Metro free subway rags, this is what we mean. (Here is the text of the State of the Union, in case you were too busy playing videogames and having a life last night.) It's not like the State of the Union is much more than political theater, sure, but next-level cynicism does some serious eroding of a citizen's ability to think and respond constructively. Lazy advertising-vehicle "news" products engineered by demonic Swedes and thrown together by a warren of garbage-crunchers and distributed to harried subway commuters are actively [...]