Posts Tagged: Drawings
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Before the Storm

Amy Jean Porter lives in the woods of Connecticut.

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Frog Wins!

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Baby, You're A Firework

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A Gallery of Misplaced Objects

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Breaststroke is the Best Stroke

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A Field Guide to the Acronymical Kingdom, Part Three

The Lol thrives in damp, dark places. Indigenous to the rain forests of Washington state, it has proved remarkably adaptable and now thrives in sewers, drain pipes, irrigation canals, port-a-potties and indoor plumbing across the North American continent. (Small populations of Lol's have even been spotted in camping grounds in the Mojave desert.)

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Rum, Sodomy & the Lash, with Jim Behrle: Doppelgänger Wëëk

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Spring It On

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Let's Help The Rockaway Horseshoe Crabs

The above footage was taken in May, when director Shervin Hess strapped a palm-sized GoPro Hero video camera to the back of a horseshoe crab with two rubber bands and set him crawling into Rocky Point Marsh, in Breezy Point, on the bay side of the Rockaway Peninsula. "The camera is neutrally buoyant and had no discernible effect on locomotion," Hess wrote on his blog, Rocky Point Marsh Makers. "After several minutes the horseshoe was relieved."

Hess, who works for PBS's wonderful nerd show "The History Detectives" with my friend Jen, has adopted Rocky Point as a clean-up project.

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An Excerpt From 'Of Lamb'

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Done With Winter!

In honor of Amy Jean Porter's newest print, just now available at 20×200, here are some new shivery late mid-winter drawings!

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Kreepie Kats: Don't Leave, Jacob! (Not Without Doing Full Frontal)

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A Field Guide to the Acronymical Kingdom, Part Two

The Wtf, an invasive species originally native to the Idaho Rockies, can now be found from Patagonia to the tropics, the Sahara to the rain forest, nature preserves to toxic waste sites.

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A Field Guide to the Acronymical Kingdom, Part One, with Willa Paskin

The Omg is an intensely social creature native to the savanna and abandoned urban centers. It continuously uses its five vocalizing trumpets to ululate to its kin, transmitting, as far as specialists can tell, information of limited relevance.