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On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@Kevin Knox Wow, we definitely live in different worlds if you think that saying you work at Goldman Sachs is "bragging", even backdoor. Especially on this blog? Anyway, I don't. Sorry, joke fell flat I guess.

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 6:54 pm 2

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@dntsqzthchrmn The reason the sentiment of this piece ticked me off is I guess this: we aren't talking about poor people here. We are talking about middle class people. People who still take vacations, (just not to St Barts) and who wear perfectly normal clothes, who go out to eat sometimes, just not at the drop of a hat. I'm sorry, but the people like this that I knew at college, and I knew many, did not feel under siege. We did not feel like we were under a microscope, and our lives weren't full of polite condescension. We lived in nice, pretty dorms, and had full meal plans, and did all the same stuff as the super rich kids, except over breaks. We all drank the same liquor and smoked the same pot. Sure, there were moments here and there when little things would come out, but it just seems like these little things somehow managed to ruin the whole four years for these kids. The idea of not going to a reunion to see all your friends because of these isolated incidents just seems like such a waste to me. I guess I wanted to share a different perspective - from people in similar positions who did not feel overwhelemed by all the mean, jerky rich people, many of whom were perfectly nice, and were my close friends (and still are) and wouldn't suggest you join them on a trip to Tahoe, because, yes there were some unspoken divisions that people understood, and managed to navigate to the best of their abilities, sometimes more clumsily than other times. It's just shocking to me that this stuff is *all* that the writers above saw. Perhaps I was too dismissive. But let me assure you, I am not suffering from false consciousness, nor do I worship at the altar of meritocracy. Maybe I get sad when I see that people had a lot less fun than they could have had?

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 6:50 pm 4

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@deepomega Any time someone draws a comparison between the discomfort one might feel about a man getting beaten nearly to death for being black, and the discomfort someone might experience, on the way to acquiring a diploma from one of the world's elite univestities, from the fact that some of his classmates wear more expensive shirts, it gets REAL hard for me to.. _____ (VERB, NOUN)

Also, I don't think I ever said "I didn't feel any class issues." In fact, I think I gave several concrete examples.

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 6:23 pm 2

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@deepomega you called me "bro."

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 6:16 pm 2

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@Butterscotch Stalin Too many years at Goldman Sachs has rendered us immune to sacrasm, so I'll just say, why thank you, I've very much enjoyed the discussion as well :)

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 6:15 pm 0

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@deepomega An whole marching army of straw men advance on your command! I wave a white flag. Well done. P.S. I'm a girl.

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 5:59 pm 1

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@Butterscotch Stalin Constructive.

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 5:42 pm 0

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@Jim Demintia Sure. Conversely, seeing the world through a perpetual prism of class differences seems to me a like a good way to ensure that the differences between you and other people will inevitably prevent you from bonding over what you have in common. Discussing differences always goes over much better once you've established how much you have in common. I realize not all people feel that way.

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 5:41 pm 3

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@dntsqzthchrmn Straw man. There's a world of a difference between "internalizing anxieties" and announcing something to the entire listserv (and then being shocked, just shocked, upon getting some dickish responses, even though dicks exist everywhere). I had dozens of productive and fascinating conversations about class and race in my four years there. None of my friends ever "internalized" any of this stuff. My point was just that when emailing hundreds of people, about, well, pretty much anything, you should have a reasonable expectation of what may result. See Mandanza's comment below on a nuanced take on how one might address the issues that inevitably to come up. It's telling that you refer to these fault lines as "anxieties." Do you think that a student-wide listserv is the proper venue to resolve one's "anxieties"? Would you email the whole dorm about your fear of spiders?

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 5:36 pm 1

On What's Invisible At Harvard: A Conversation

@deepomega Oh, this whole thing about how we can't use well-accepted metaphors? You've never heard of the term "bomb thrower" to refer to rhetoric? It gets REAL hard for me know where to go from there. Please see defition 3:

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bomb%20thrower

I assume you get equally mad when people "take aim" at something even though they are clearly not talking about guns, etc etc.

Posted on July 21, 2011 at 5:22 pm 2