Posts Tagged: Privacy
3

A Framework for the Public Sharing of Internet Posts

In response to recent conversations regarding the public/private status of Internet Posts, a proposal for a framework for the sharing of Internet Posts:

Attribution-Commercial-Derivs-Fear-Injury-Death

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your Internet Posts, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered; anyone can do anything to your Internet Post. It can be placed in any context, including contexts which the rights holder does not like. It may be used to either glorify or humiliate its creator. It may be used to intentionally inspire threats of assault or death against its creator. Recommended [...]

23

Why Is America Turning To Shit?

Toilet in Uganda, by Sustainable Sanitation.

1. THIS SHIT IS REAL

My hand stayed on the bathroom door handle, unwilling to twist the knob that would let me in. Behind me was the hum and chatter of an art opening—this was at a now sadly departed radical Chicago cultural center called Mess Hall. On a table nearby were offerings of hummus and home-made brownies. Nearly everyone else was chatting and oblivious to my plight, but I could sense at least one other person impatiently waiting behind me. Then I went in, and, inside, next to a perfectly serviceable modern flush toilet seat, was a five-gallon bucket of [...]

7

Email Privacy Bill Rewritten To Actually Remove Email Privacy

"A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans' e-mail privacy has been quietly rewritten, giving government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law. [Senator Pat] Leahy's rewritten bill would allow more than 22 agencies—including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Communications Commission—to access Americans' e-mail, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a search warrant." —Maybe we're all better off without the Senate protecting our Internet privacy. UPDATE: Tech industry people get angry, Leahy kills the warrantless part, for now.

5

A Conversation with Misha Angrist, Publisher of His Genome

Misha Angrist, otherwise known as member four of the Personal Genome Project, has—along with Stephen Pinker and some other science-world luminaries—given permission for his entire genome to be published online. As a trained geneticist, he's more equipped to predict the direction and effects of DNA research than the rest of us. His new book, Here is a Human Being, ponders the implications of this kind of bioforensics for our culture at large, and also for those of us, like me, who've already opened this Pandora's box by subscribing to 23andme or one of the other personal genomics outlets. Will our information be kept private? [...]

46

The Internet: It's Pretty Much As Mean As All Of Us

The New York Times takes some time out to haul out the always-salient question "What Is Wrong With People On The Internet?" today, this time in a Styles piece by Taffy Broedesser-Akner that looks at the more vicious reactions she received to a Salon article she had penned on the PTSD she dealt with after the particularly violent birth of her son. The Salon story eventually resulted in pseudonymous Internet people taking time out of their days to tell her things like "Do us all a favor — don't have any more kids." Yeesh. So much for The New Niceness!

3

Life and Death on the Bear Cam

The bear cams are back: Feeds from Katmai National Park in Alaska are going live this week. Some are powered up already and in testing; others are still coming online. The bear cams have become an odd yearly ritual for the nature-obsessed and vocationally computer-bound alike, developing an avid fan base that tracks the comings and goings of dozens upon dozens of feeding bears. Each year the cameras get better, their hours longer, and their stories richer.

So what will happen in 2014? What are we in for? I called Roy Wood, Chief of Interpretation for Katmai National Park, who helps run the cams. He told me a [...]

1

Stoya on Sex, Sexing, Sexism, Sexuality And Cleaning The Cat Box

At the 2013 Adult Video Awards, I had the good fortune to meet the woman who calls herself Stoya. She’s mercurial, striking, and staggeringly smart—by turns a writer, lyra acrobat, and wildly successful adult performer. She’s also a busy bee. The other day we talked about privacy, sexuality, the Internet, feminism, pizza delivery guys and doing porn when she’s 50. Her Instagram is entirely cat-related.

The Awl: So, how long have you worked in the industry?

Stoya: Mm…since late 2007. So, six years?

The Awl: What are you doing in LA right now? Are you shooting stuff or just visiting or…?

Stoya: Well, it’s gonna be [...]

13

The End of Privacy: Address Books with Friends

So all the apps that take and upload and store your address books (which is a lot of them!) are making changes to their apps! By… sort of vaguely notifying you that they are doing so. So… not by not doing that. For instance, Twitter: "In place of 'Scan your contacts,' we will use 'Upload your contacts' and 'Import your contacts.'" Ha! Good one. Because "upload" really means "we're going to store every phone number and address and name of everyone in your phone for 18 months." WELL? Once people started digitally "signing" that endless user agreement in iTunes without clicking through all 36 or 42 pages [...]

8

There Are A Thousand Barry Dillers Watching You From Inside Your Computer

I know there are tracking bugs running on my computer because wherever I go on the Internet, I get identical ads. You probably do too! And you know why? Because you're the pig-trough at which Barry Diller's feeding, according to a review of secretly-installed web-tracking cookies that collect profiles for resale: "The top venue for such technology, the Journal found, was IAC/InterActive Corp.'s Dictionary.com. A visit to the online dictionary site resulted in 234 files or programs being downloaded onto the Journal's test computer, 223 of which were from companies that track Web users…. 'Whether it's one or 10 cookies, it doesn't have any impact on the customer experience, [...]

279

Matt Cherette Is Going To Move To New York City

Matt Cherette is 25 and lives in Grand Haven, Michigan, about fifteen minutes from his parents' house. He traveled to New York in the second week of February and while he was here, he signed the paperwork for a job at Gawker.TV. He would be their night coordinator. This was an opportunity to actually get paid for the sort of diligent content repurposing that he's been doing for free, for years, on the LiveJournal-hosted gossip community Oh No They Didn't.

While he was in New York, he came to a party thrown by his new boss, Richard Blakeley, at Destination Bar, on Avenue A. The Tennessee-Vanderbilt game was [...]

8

They're Watching You On Email, On Reddit, On The Phone, At The Mall. What Are You Going To Do?

In addition to her work on privacy at ProPublica, Julia Angwin's Dragnet Nation is available today wherever booksellers are spying on you.

Amazon

McNally Jackson

Powell's

B&N

An independent bookstore near you

You are being tracked. Besides comprehensive government spying, there are hundreds of data brokers compiling and selling information about you: Phone records, texts, phone location, computer location, web history, social networking use, background checks, credit history and now even entrance to some retail stores, with facial recognition linking you to your online data.

Julia Angwin, a reporter for ProPublica who was on a Pulitzer-winning team [...]

5

The Adults Kids Fear

"To adults, services like Facebook that may seem “private” because you can use privacy tools, but they don’t feel that way to youth who feel like their privacy is invaded on a daily basis. (This, btw, is part of why teens feel like Twitter is more intimate than Facebook. And why you see data like Pew’s that show that teens on Facebook have, on average 300 friends while, on Twitter, they have 79 friends.) Most teens aren’t worried about strangers; their worried about getting into trouble."

4

Our Well-Paid Public Intellectuals Do It In Public (When Not At Davos)

Jeff Jarvis' Public Parts, released September 27th and currently 12,098 in "books" on Amazon, has come under review by Evgeny Morozov. It is a rather singularly vicious review. From early on: "Why are we so obsessed with privacy? Jarvis blames rapacious privacy advocates—'there is money to be made in privacy'—who are paid to mislead the 'netizens,' that amorphous elite of cosmopolitan Internet users whom Jarvis regularly volunteers to represent in Davos. On Jarvis’s scale of evil, privacy advocates fall between Qaddafi’s African mercenaries and greedy investment bankers. All they do is 'howl, cry foul, sharpen arrows, get angry, get rankled, are incredulous, are concerned, watch, and fret.' [...]

9

Mark Zuckerberg Says, Changes Some Things

"Now we'll be giving you the ability to control who can see your friends and pages. These fields will no longer have to be public." -The Zuckbot has spoken: changes are being made in privacy settings on Facebook. For more entertainment, the conference call is archived here. ("Q (Nick Bilton, New York Times): What are yours plans for the upcoming location service? Will this create another backlash? A (Zuckerberg): We will try not to create another backlash.")