Posts Tagged: Media
1

Balance of Power

Equilibrium in nature: The proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger, announced in February, has set off a wave of activity in the media industry, with AT&T Inc. announcing a $48.5 billion deal for DirecTV that would rival Comcast’s heft in the cable and satellite business. One rationale for the deals is that they would give the cable and satellite groups more leverage in negotiations with entertainment companies and help contain rising programming costs.

In turn, the $80 billion offer that 21st Century Fox made for Time Warner, which was disclosed last week, would restore some leverage to the entertainment groups.

Why worry about the endless series of mergers, consolidations, [...]

0

Promotion Accepted

"John Cantarella used to run high-profile Web sites for Time Inc. Now he has a new job: Getting high-profile people to post things on Facebook."

18

The Trials of 'Entertainment Weekly': One Magazine's 24 Years of Corporate Torture

Jessica Alba on the cover of Entertainment Weekly in March of 2001, summer of 2006, and again this month.

When I was a young and odd child, one of the oddest things I did was collect Entertainment Weekly. Our family, like so many middle class families, had always had a subscription to Time, and one day Entertainment Weekly began arriving with it. In those early days, it was called entertainment weekly, and in many ways, it resembled many of the entertainment websites (The A.V. Club, Grantland, Vulture) that dominate the field today. There were long, industry-oriented cover stories, buttressed by surprisingly non-banal interviews with stars, producers, directors, [...]

14

Reddit Reeling From Brutal Dox Of Alleged Bitcoin Founder Satoshi Nakamoto

With Leah McGrath Goodman's identification of the founder of Bitcoin at Newsweek (not really a slam-dunk case? But, I'll take it, for now?), the greater Bitcoin-Internet is aghast. How dare this magazine expose this person? Not only are the comments on the piece itself entirely about how outrageous the reveal is, certainly Reddit is AFLAME.

"This is unbelievable. How can we, as a community, protect Satoshi? It's on us. He gave us this gift. What can we do for him? I'm thinking bounties on the heads of any criminal that touches Satoshi? Is that too rash?"

"This is scary as hell. This thing makes me [...]

0

Being Good At Working With Jews Is Half The Battle

"I'm good at working with Jews, says Chinese tycoon Chen Guangbiao who wants to buy WSJ"

18

Six Lesser-Known "Golden Ages" of Media, 1991 – 2005

Do you hate it when your friends, co-workers and office enemies become successful? Then be careful where you work. What outfits like PostBourgie have done—it is now too late to stop the Grape Drink Mafia!—is gather together a super-smart (or sometimes just super-aggressive) group of people that will go on to success and perhaps even dominance in media. (You could say something similar about n+1, but they're all basically unemployed novelists, and there weren't that many of them anyway. What about The New Inquiry? Well, only time will tell. Check back in later 2013.)

Over the last twenty years, a handful of scenes emerged that seem [...]

34

Why Are Reporters Constantly Misquoting People?

Los Angeles Times reporter Jasmine Elist interviewed the author known as "Marie Calloway." (That is a pen name; if you don't know her, you could start here.) The Times published the interview as a Q&A on Monday. Calloway's response? "I was misquoted a lot tbf." (Old people: "tbf" stands for "to be fair." I know, it's just so many letters, thank God.) "To be fair" is a weird construction there: to be fair to whom? I asked the reporter about it, baitingly.

@Choire :) No, I don't. But I do think she'll always have a bone to pick with the people who interview her

— Jasmine Elist [...]

1

History Recorded

Hacked? EPA Office of Water tweets about Kardashian App

EPA tweet about Kim Kardashian confuses and entertains the Internet

Kim Kardashian App Takes Over Environmental Protection Agency's Twitter

EPA Office of Water Is Caught Playing Kim Kardashian Mobile Game

‘That Happened’: The Head-Scratching Tweet From an Official EPA Account That Had Some People ‘Howling’ With Laughter

Kim Kardashian App Takes Over Government Agency's Twitter Account

3

The New Media Boom Times

Everything's coming up ᴄᴏɴᴛᴇɴᴛ: Vinit Bharara made his fortune selling Pampers and Huggies. Now he wants to capitalize on a business fast becoming as commodified as diapers: digital content.

His new site, Cafe, will be "a mass publication that explores everything and anything," Bharara tells the Times, the most venerable content prospecting operation east of the Mississippi. "If I need to be practical, I’ll be practical." But for now? Diap up, it's time to hit publish.

Vice is continuing its interminable will-they-won't-they media sales tour, conjuring a $2.5 billion valuation in the pages of the Times business section ("Vice would also arrive [at Time Warner, Disney or [...]

3

The Man Behind Tech's Most Captivating Tweets

As the New York Times's State of the Art columnist, Farhad Manjoo occupies the tallest perch in mainstream tech journalism. He's a lucid writer and extremely affable—both strikingly rare charms in tech writing. More importantly, though, he produces one of the most oddly compelling Twitter feeds in media, a stream of straightforward commentary ("But voicemail. Of the things that have been said to be dead and really are — voicemail is one") punctuated by bracing naiveté ("Are there real people who live/work in live/work lofts? I don't believe it") and borderline absurdist snippets of everyday life ("I am eating an unexpectedly delicious Chipotle burrito. Really well done on [...]

2

Who Will Pay For The Falling Snow?

You can call it a "revolution in multimedia storytelling that has swept through digital publishing the past year" or you can call it "an indiscriminate assemblage of tech gimmickry in search of a purpose" or, for the sake of concision, you can call it "Snowfall," but the question remains, how are these dazzling displays of "immersive" journalism to be paid for, particularly when you consider that the only people who really pay attention to them are other folks working in media already? Nobody knows yet!

2

How Much Money Does 'New York' Magazine Make?

If I worked at New York magazine, I'd spend the day cross-referencing people hair-rending on Twitter about the magazine going biweekly with the subscriber list. Just saying.

Looking at the MPA data for New York magazine gives one small side of the story. Sampling Q1 and Q3 data since 2006, actual reported print revenue doesn't change that radically, at least since the Great Downturn or whatever we're calling it.

But total ad pages per quarter does change.

What's interesting is that the magazine, like, you know, lots of magazines, makes lots of money. According to the Times, going biweekly "will yield about $3.5 million in savings." [...]

7

What A Wonderful Week—And Future!—For The 'New York Times'!

To adapt Robin Williams' immortal comment on cocaine, buying a newspaper could be God’s way of telling you you’re making too much money. (But not for long—ha-ha.) The sales of the Boston Globe to Red Sox owner John Henry and the Washington Post to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos at prices reflecting but a glimmer of the gold they once traded for has triggered a bull market in speculation over the general future of newspapers and the fate of the New York Times, in particular.

The oracular spectacular (nicely annotated for posterity by Tom McGeveran in Capital New York) led the paper to issue a memo emphatically saying this [...]

0

Motives Impugned

"When British editors or writers do stories like this they are punting for a job in New York."

2

Electorate Well-Stressed

"The survey of more than 2,500 Americans found that about 1 in 4 said they had experienced a 'great deal' of stress in the previous month. And these stressed-out people said one of the biggest contributors to their day-to-day stress was watching, reading or listening to the news."

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The One True Comment Section

But what if we could build a commenting system that gives commenters a real sense of ownership? What if readers could manage their online identity and contributions across news sites under a single sign-in? What if they could contribute pictures, links, even their own stories? What if they could track discussions and form friendships with one another? Wouldn’t that system build a sense of community and lead to self-policing and civility?

"But what if" seems to be the impetus behind the Knight Foundation's $4 million grant to a joint New York Times, Washington Post and Mozilla Foundation project to fix, save, or salvage internet commenting. What's missing from this [...]

0

What's White And Read All Over?

@SarahMaslinNir @errollouis @deBlasioNYC is the city hall press corps really all white?

— Nick Malinowski (@nwmalinowski) March 11, 2014

I mean, probably not, right? Anyway, I hope everyone here is wearing sunscreen.

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A Hard Snow's a-Gonna Fall

"Immersive Storytelling" would be a good name for an album by a terrible band.

6

Mobile Savagery: China Meets An Unprepared World

July 26th brought news items reporting two separate incidents of curious holiday gastronomy. First, tourists in the Paracel Islands posted pictures of a meal of Tridacna gigas—endangered giant clams. At the same time, vacationers in Greece snapped photos of themselves hoisting an extraordinarily rare "hexapus," only the second ever recorded, just before killing it and frying it in a nearby pub. Yet only one of these stories was largely used as evidence to feed an expansive and growing set of opinions about an entire nationality and culture.

Of all China's frighteningly fast advances, international travel is, in light of history, maybe its most stunning. Two decades [...]

15

The Letter

William Shawn began work at The New Yorker in 1933, was appointed managing editor in 1939 and, quite shortly after the death of founding editor Harold Ross, became the magazine's editor in 1951.

In 1985, 34 years later, Shawn was still the editor, but Peter Fleischmann, the son of founding partner Raoul Fleischmann, owned only 25% of shares in The New Yorker. Paine Webber owned the next largest share, and the Newhouse family's Advance Publications already owned around 17% of the publication. Advance wanted, and got, the rest, for a price something like 20 times current revenues, according to the Times.

The employees, however, were not happy [...]