Posts Tagged: Change
2

NY1 Redesigned To Include One Less Hot Jogging Guy

In Time Warner's effort to "rebrand" NY1 to make it look just like other Time Warner local properties (WHY? We don't care about other properties!), they've redone the music and bumpers and titles and stuff. Fine. But there's a casualty of this change, as there always is.

@tmcgev @choire I didn't even know there was a hot jogger. Reviewing tapes now.

— Pat Kiernan (@patkiernan) December 16, 2013

That's right. Along the way, NY1 killed Hot Jogger Guy, who used to appear in the pre-weather montage thingey, whoever he is. RIP Hot Jogger Guy. We'll always have this screenshot of you.

3

Justin Timberland and Jay-Z, "Suit & Tie"

All right. This song is growing on me. It's just so expertly done in every facet. And the video helps. It's exactly what it should it be. (Justin Timberlake eats cereal while Jay-Z watches basketball. They're just like us!) Which is all totally what you'd expect. Immaculate execution, carefully engineered for maximum possible popular appeal. Which points to the problem, too, of course. "But he don't know the meaning of dope," said GZA, complaining about a honkey A&R executive on the Wu-Tang's "Protect Ya Neck." "When he's looking for a suit-and-tie rap that's cleaner than a bar of soap!"

9

Hello, Welcome To Blockbuster, May I Help You

I graduated high school in 1997 and I went to work at the Winn Dixie deli counter, which totally sucked. I was still living at home and that fall I enrolled at Tallahassee Community College. I was more unsure of my future than at any other point in my life before or since.

A friend from high school had recently been hired at Blockbuster, and he got me a job there too that fall. Blockbuster was a step up. Not only did we not have to handle foodstuffs, but we also got free video rentals—although we didn’t get health care, or vacation, or sick days.

But I cannot overstate the [...]

0

The Future of Libraries, Copyright, Ebooks–and Lawyering

"Right now, only two of the six largest American publishers allow libraries to lend all of their e-books, and one of those two sells licenses that expire after twenty-six check-outs…. Publishers have tried charging libraries higher prices for e-books. They've tried introducing technologically unnecessary 'friction,' such as a ban on simultaneous loans of a title, or a requirement that library patrons come in person to the library to load their reading devices. The friction frustrates library patrons and enrages librarians, and even so, it hasn't been substantial enough to reassure the publishers who are abstaining from the library market altogether."