Wednesday, October 29th, 2014
1

Shift The Darkness Around, It Won't Help Any

It's funny when people make distinctions about whether it's darker in the morning or the evening, as if it isn't the most obvious truth of our time that it's all darkness, and it's not going to get any better, ever. That said, the clocks go back this Sunday, so the inherent sense of gloom and futility you feel of an afternoon—the crushing knowledge that there's no point to any of it and no one is less useful than you and the sorrowful certainty that the things you spend your sad little days worrying about are just additions to the list of wasted time and chances missed—will be settling in an [...]

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1

Bing & Ruth, "The Towns We Love Is Our Town"

As everything becomes progressively more terrible and the pace of the progression accelerates at a clip that, each time I notice it, seems even more aggressive and unlikely when compared with the speed at which the previous increase in awfulness occurred, it seems that the few new things in which I find comfort are those which reduce or eschew altogether the use of words. Words are terrible. Our only hope is in everyone shutting up. The future is wordless sound. Listen to this. [Via]

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1

Man Persists

I first heard the words "My friends are gone and my hair is grey/I ache in the places where I used to play" when I was sixteen and, at that age, I assumed it was some sort of sorrowful commentary on the failings of the flesh. Now that I am older and all of those things are happening to me I realize that it is a rueful acknowledgment of how even the spaces which memory marks as the scenes of your happiest occasions are freighted with accumulations of sadness and regret. But also the thing about the body breaking down, because what doesn't hurt at this point, right? Anyway, [...]

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2

Book Tells You What Money Is

"Rising inequality is not a law of nature – it's not even a law of economics. It is a consequence of political and economic arrangements, and those arrangements can be changed," writes John Lanchester. I'm a cynical fuck who thinks hope for a better world is futile since we're all doomed to toil as servants for the thin and calcifying slice of the upper class that runs everything and there's no way we're ever going to get it together enough to change things, particularly with all the distractions and sedatives this modern world has to hey is that a new iPhone? But Lanchester, [...]

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17

Escape Artist Tells All

Awl pal Mary HK Choi managed to make a certain kind of dream come true: She left New York. And now she has a thing she wrote about it, a thing that you can and should buy. Let’s learn more!

Balk: Mary HK Choi, you have a new thing you wrote called [KINDLE SINGLE TITLE TK]. Tell me about it!

MHKC: I do, it's called Oh, Never Mind and it's a collection [...]

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4

Fall Preview

Autumn will start off with a series of false beginnings and vague feelings of dislocation as summer lingers longer than everyone expects, even though summer here always easily extends into the end of September and sometimes beyond. When the days draw down and the sun starts to set earlier and earlier you will increasingly develop an overwhelming sense of opportunities missed and chances wasted as each event you had hoped to attend or goal you had your sights set on achieving becomes yet another adventure you opted out of under the empty promise that there was something better going on, and this endless buffet of poor choices will eventually lead [...]

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0

When Lights Are Low In London

"SCARED residents are snapping up stab proof vests and protective clothing to shield themselves from attacks during the street light switch-off, an Essex defence company boss claims."

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0

Thomas Berger, 1924-2014

"More than anything, the paradoxical logic by which Berger unfolds his scenes connects him to Kafka. Too many contemporary writers kowtow to Kafka in mummery: ostentatiously dreamlike settings, Shadows and Fog-ian Eastern European atmosphere or diction. Berger engages with Kafka's influence at a more native and universal level, by grasping the way Kafka reconstructed fictional time and causality to align it with his emotional and philosophical reservations about human life. Berger's tone, like Kafka's, never oversells paranoia or despair, and the results are, actually, never dreamlike. Instead, Berger locates that part of our waking life that unfolds in the manner of Zeno's Paradox, where it is possible only to [...]

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2

Tove Styrke, "Even If I'm Loud It Doesn't Mean I'm Talking to You"

Should you find yourself at some point today overcome by torpor, perhaps due to climatic conditions in your area or simply the prevalence of complaints concerning climatic conditions on social media, this song may provide a brief burst of energy before the fatigue inevitably takes hold once more. Yes, it's going to be hot. The sun will scorch your pasty skin and lethargy will lay its heavy hand upon your sweaty shoulders as it implores you to join it on the couch. But consider: We are barely past June's midpoint here, people. Don't waste all your whining just yet; think of how disappointed you'll be with yourself come August [...]

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3

Stop Blaming The Internet For How Horrible We All Are

Awl pal Matthew J.X. Malady weighs in on what the cognoscenti refer to as Balk's Law, or the idea that everything you hate about The Internet is actually everything you hate about people.

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2

Whose Nothing Is It Anyway?

"Art star Marina Abramović and London’s Serpentine Gallery have become embroiled in a row over 'nothing'. A prestigious group of curators and art historians have written to the gallery questioning why Abramović’s latest performance piece – due to open 11 June and about which she has repeatedly emphasised the importance of 'nothing' – fails to acknowledge the influence of another contemporary artist who has also made 'nothing' central to her work."

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1

Euthanized Bear In Better Place Now

"Albany's celebrity bear has climbed its last tree." —I'm not happy about it either. Maybe just watch this instead to cheer yourself up.

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0

John Maginnis, 1948-2014

Political analyst John Maginnis, whose The Last Hayride and Cross to Bear are not only two of the greatest books written about Louisiana politics, but are also pretty high on the list of greatest books about Southern politics, and merit appearances on the list of greatest books about American politics in general, has died. Maginnis was 66.

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12

What Does Your Whorephone Say About You?

"The 26-year-old keeps his sex list on Evernote in his iPhone, recording all 41 women he’s slept with, including Ashley, who took his virginity, four Katies and two Sarahs. He says he frequently looks back on it to analyze how he’s grown and changed as a person."

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1

The History Of Maud Newton

"Random House will publish writer and critic Maud Newton’s first book, an examination of her obsession with genealogy and her own colorful family history, along with the science and superstition of ancestry in the culture at large. Newton’s essay, ‘America’s Ancestry Craze,’ is the cover story for the current issue of Harper’s magazine. This interdisciplinary study will draw on memoir, reporting, cultural criticism, scientific and anthropological research to understand the fear and fascination behind genealogy, and why it has become the second most popular hobby in the United States. Newton began blogging about books and culture in 2002; within a few years her site was one of the most widely [...]

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4

Fucking Steak And How To Cook It

Awww, the New York Times thinks it has "a rock-solid new system" for cooking steak at home. That's so cute! Adorable! I am both tickled and amused by this delightful attempt at disrupting the cooking-steak-at-home space. It's just so sweet! Also LISTEN UP NEW YORK TIMES DINING READERS, NEW YORK TIMES DINING WRITERS AND ANYONE ELSE WITHIN THE SOUND OF MY VOICE: This is how you cook a fucking steak. There is no other way, and there will be no further discussion or appeals [...]

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0

Lieutenant Governor Liked, But Is He Well-Liked?

"Most political observers gave the sober Duffy good marks for his lieutenant governorshipdom, but he still only has 1,500 followers on Twitter compared to Gov. Cuomo’s 116,000."

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9

The Second Closet

"For many members of the LGBT community, the first time they came out, it was to tell the world they were gay. The second time, it was to tell the world they…" —Go ahead, guess.

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1

Uncorrected Version Sounds Better

"A theater review on Tuesday about 'The Spring Fling: First Love' at the Access Theater in Manhattan, using information from the program, reversed the description of two of the six short plays that are presented. 'PWNED' by Mark Sitko is about people playing video games, and 'The Morning After' by Lauren Yee features a couple torturing a man."

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