The Right to Disassembly

How an amendment smothered the right to protest in Montreal.

New York City, March 5, 2015

weather review sky 030515★★★★★ The subconscious, taking what it had last seen and felt before bed, dreamed of a rainy letdown, a lingering thaw. Nor did the phone ring early to announce any school closing. So it was a surprise to open the blinds onto exactly what had been forecast, a grayout of seedy little flakes already reclaiming the briefly unfrozen world. It was coming down fast enough to put a clean blue tinge on even the roadways. Snow was building on the uptown faces of traffic signs and the windward edge of poles; a schoolbus roof was lumpily furred with it. Somehow the snow was blowing all the way down the subway stairs and angling onto the landing from the left and from the right, neat and symmetrical as theater curtains. It was accumulating substantially on the hoods and backpacks of the streetwear shoppers as they stood in line. A woman walked half-twisted to talk to her companion through the narrow aperture of her hood. A minivan’s passenger-side wiper, missing its blade, thrust its uselessly twisting arm out into space.  The snow had packed itself into the little seams at the top of the parka’s zipper. It fell and fell, the flakes now generously large—ideal, unfaltering, the long icy winter’s finest storm. There was no getting ahead of it or out from under: It built up on railings, windowsills, the edges of dumpsters, every detail of the city made cleaner and taller and new. It did not omit the surfaces of the fliers announcing a film shoot, or the lids of the coffee cups left by the cafe’s smoking bench. The people themselves blurred, disheveled hair mixing with the ragged supplemental hairdos of a fur hat or a ruffed hood. The slush shushed or splutted frankly underfoot. Not until the blue of twilight did the flakes dwindle, a full day’s work complete.

“The Holiday Cocktail Lounge, which closed in 2012, will reopen Monday under the same name in the same spot on St. Marks Place. Though the management has changed, enough of the bar’s ancient innards have been retained that old regulars will recognize a familiar friend.”#

Talking with Will Forte About 'The Last Man on Earth,' 'Clone High,' and the 'MacGruber' Sequel

will_forte_lastmanonearthFrom his eight years on SNL to his roles on 30 Rock, Tim and Eric, and cult hit MacGruber, Will Forte has been one of comedy’s most lovable bastions of gutsy weirdness of the past decade, and now he finally has a show all his own. The Last Man on Earth premiered last Sunday on Fox, and it centers on Forte and fellow 30 Rock alum Kristen Schaal as a pair of lonely, desperate apocalypse survivors who aren’t exactly relieved to discover each other’s existence. I recently spoke with Forte about developing his own show, what he’s learned from working with co-creators Phil Lord and Chris Miller, and whether or not we can count on a comeback for two of his greatest projects, MacGruber and Clone High.

Four Common Household Mysteries Explained

Brought to you by Piper nv.

Ever wonder why your socks disappear in the laundry, or who keeps messing with the thermostat? Take a look below at four common household mysteries, and some simple solutions that will help you stay on top of your household’s happenings.

1. Who Keeps Messing With The Thermostat?
Why is that your house will go from toasty to frigid in a matter of seconds, even when you set the thermostat before bed? Often, a thermostat’s programmer will turn your heating system off at night, which is a big problem if you live in a cold climate and your home isn’t well insulated. Double-check the settings of your thermostat and adjust the temperature and scheduling to fit your desired preferences so that you don’t have to wake up to a freezing cold home anymore.

2. What’s With This High Electricity Bill?
Was this month’s electricity bill way higher than you anticipated? Perhaps you accidentally left a patio light on for days, or an appliance was running unnecessarily. An automated lighting and appliance control can solve this problem; it’ll monitor your home’s lighting and appliances even when you’re away.

You can’t stay sad for ever, you know?#

Minutes From a Meeting at the Bay Area Radical Transit Association Known as Lyft

lyft“Hey guys. I’ve got an idea. It’s kind of crazy, but stick with me. Getting around in cities, it kind of sucks, right? Things are far apart but it’s so crowded and the traffic is bad and you have to waste all this time driving, when you could be checking your email or your Twitter or playing Clash of Clans or whatever. And thousands—maybe millions—of people are facing this same dilemma. So, like, imagine if there were places you could go in the city, like designated spots, maybe like intersections or something in these densely populated areas, and these designated spots never changed, and if you went to them at certain times, you could pay a nominal fee to get into a vehicle of some kind that would just like take you to other spots within a designated area. And not just you, but like, practically anyone, like the public, man. We could call it…HotSpots. I know it’s like almost cheesy but I think it works really well because the spots are popular, like hot, and I really think that people will need something familiar, because like wireless hotspots, to wrap their head around this concept, because it’s so totally radical.”

“Wow. It could fail miserably because no one’s ever done anything like that, but we have to try. We just have to. Not just for the public. But for our investors.”

On Doing Everything Right and Still Making the Wrong Decision

My husband and I are a supposedly elusive breed: the Millennial Homeowner. However, this is not something we are celebrating. Three years ago, newly engaged and living in a new area, we started looking for houses. It was a kind of mania with me, some programming that we needed the house and the big yard and the mortgage to be real adults, to be successful. We had been very careful financially.

Both of us are teachers, and we had spent years limiting our spending and living in cheap apartments, squirreling away money for the house of our dreams. My soon-to-be-husband especially was a big saver, quietly amassing over $20,000 dollars in his bank account over two years, while I was not far behind with my own savings. When we moved to a new place, a beautiful, rural area of Virginia that bordered the Chesapeake Bay, our suburbia-raised selves rejoiced. Everywhere we looked were wide-open fields, desolate beaches, roads lined with wildflowers. We went for bike rides and ate fresh seafood and thought: This. This is it. Weʼre going to stay here forever.

So, when I saw a listing for a historic farmhouse on three acres, I immediately took a drive past it. Bordered on one side by a few acres of woods, with a big backyard, perfect for those imagined future kids and pets! With the house flanked by beautiful, old trees, I was overjoyed. I came back that weekend with my fiance and my father, a real estate agent who was visiting us for the weekend. The house was less perfect once we were inside. The owner had clearly not done anything, including clean, in a long time. The floors needed refinishing, the kitchen made my stomach turn, and rooms were decorated with ancient pink carpets and deeply creepy stuffed animals. In one of the rooms, the ownerʼs dog had thrown up at some distant point in the past, and it had gone unnoticed. A dead mouse lay in the middle of another room. However, all these things added up to one thing for us: a low price. 

Washington D.C., Ranked

1. Veep
2. Scandal
3. Alpha House
4. House of Cards
5. Homeland

“Over millions of years, essential genes haven’t changed very much, while junk DNA has picked up many harmless mutations. Scientists at the University of Oxford have measured evolutionary change over the past 100 million years at every spot in the human genome. ‘I can today say, hand on my heart, that 8 percent, plus or minus 1 percent, is what I would consider functional,’ Chris Ponting, an author of the study, says. And the other 92 percent? ‘It doesn’t seem to matter that much.'”#

Chromatics, "I Can Never Be Myself When You're Around"


I am fairly impressed by the way Chromatics have been able to sustain the aesthetic they first committed to with Night Drive back in 2007 (I know, it didn’t seem right to me either but I went and double-checked and yes, it was that long ago, wrinkled sadface emoji goes here) while still making interesting records that so perfectly encapsulate a particular mood, but life is full of surprises if you know where to look. If you are unfamiliar with Chromatics, one good place to look is here.