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Raise a Glass to Pure Water

Brought to you by Finlandia

Water is a part of our lives in many ways that we often don’t think about. Without pure water we would not have playgrounds for surfing, wakeboarding, or snowboarding. These activities rely on clean water sources now, and for future generations.

The relationship with water runs deep with Finlandia vodka. To support pure water projects, Finlandia is donating 1% of its U.S. sales to environmental organizations that support pure water initiatives, including the Oyster Recovery Partnership, Protect Our Winters, Coastal Conservation Association, Virginia Oyster Shell Recycling Program, and New York/New Jersey Baykeepers.

To support pure water efforts, you can give back to that perfect wave you surfed over the weekend, you can donate to that epic powder day last month, and you can help save that sunset kayak. Grab your smartphone and a Finlandia cocktail, then post a pic of you raising a glass with the tag #4PureWater on Instagram or Twitter. For your help spreading the pure water message Finlandia will donate a dollar to one of our pure water initiatives up to $10,000. It only takes a minute to post your pic and help protect the water that you look forward to playing in all season long.

Check out the video above and get behind the pure water that gives us all so much. Learn more about Finlandia #4PureWater here.

Live Magnificently. Drink Responsibly.

Alc./Vol. and Finlandia Flavored Vodkas 37.5% Alc./Vol. Imported by Brown-Forman Beverages, Louisville, KY. FINLANDIA and FINLANDIA VODKA ™ & ©2015 Brown-Forman Finland. All rights reserved.

“We loved this show. My husband said he enjoyed the ‘wipes’ segment more than all the politics. He never watches MSNBC with me, but he got interested in this one.”#

Yoga for the Silicon Valley Mogul

asgskjghSilicon Valley’s most successful men—and it is exclusively men here!—are finding new ways to contort themselves in the glow of their own wealth, at the racetrack:

Stan Chudnovsky, the head of product management on Facebook’s messaging app, pointed to another way that racing could be cheap: Renting a fast car for a day on the racetrack can sate one’s desire to buy one for the garage. “You don’t want to be the guy who actually buys a Ferrari, and then everyone is looking at you like, ‘I can’t believe you did that,’ ” Mr. Chudnovsky said. “At the same time, you don’t want to not know what it is to drive one. It gives you the ability to experience the best that cars can offer without actually owning all those cars.”



Photo by Andrew Hobbs

According to Topsy, Periscope has caught up to Meerkat on Twitter in just 24 hours. Yesterday, there were 23,693 tweets linking to Periscope URLs and just 24,029 linking to Meerkat livestream URLs. The day before, Topsy recorded 28,631 Meerkat livestreem URLs on Twitter.#

“[M]odern thinkers look to numbers for signs that show the emergence of a world founded on rational and moral principles. They believe that improvement in ethics and politics is incremental and accretive: one advance is followed by another in a process that stabilises and strengthens the advances that have already taken place. Now and then regress may occur, but when this happens it does so against a background in which the greater part of what has been achieved so far does not pass away. Slowly, over time, the world is becoming a better place. The ancient world, along with all the major religions and pre-modern philosophies, had a different and truer view. Improvements in civilisation are real enough, but they come and go. While knowledge and invention may grow cumulatively and at an accelerating rate, advances in ethics and politics are erratic, discontinuous and easily lost. Amid the general drift, cycles can be discerned: peace and freedom alternate with war and tyranny, eras of increasing wealth with periods of economic collapse. Instead of becoming ever stronger and more widely spread, civilisation remains inherently fragile and regularly succumbs to barbarism. This view, which was taken for granted until sometime in the mid-18th century, is so threatening to modern hopes that it is now practically incomprehensible.”
New John Gray coming soon! Pre-order now!#

Neurotica: Erotica For the Slightly Anxious

12TR-November-1932-couple-Jules-Cannert-final
He pulled me close to him, his hips grinding up against my own. “I promise you,” he said. “I’m not into you because you remind me of my mother who was emotionally distant after my father died.” I kissed him, my heart pumping furiously now that he had answered one question that had been plaguing me all along.

“Are you sure?” I asked. “You’re not just saying that because you know it’s what I want to hear? If you are, just tell me. I’ll be fine with it. But honesty is really important to me.” He stopped my ramblings by covering my mouth with his hand. “I’m not just saying that,” he said, then dropped his hand to my waist. Before I could say anything, he added, his hot breath against my neck, “I washed my hands with soap and hot water just before this. Don’t worry.” I sighed, relieved that I hadn’t just been exposed to a handful of New York City germs. Did he use brand soap or generic? I should have checked his bathroom more closely when I had gone in earlier, but I had been too busy examining the mold-less shower curtain. “Brand,” he whispered as if he could read my mind. “Mrs. Meyers’ Clean Day.” He was sanitary and eco-friendly. My knees weakened and he pulled me towards him again, this time with more force.

Jamie xx, "Loud Places (feat. Romy)"


If even the fact that the weekend is within our grasp is not nearly enough to motivate you this morning I suggest you listen to this a little; it is bound to help. [Via]

New York City, March 25, 2015

★ Murk blurred the river, one of only two faults on a fine February morning, the other fault being that April was less than a week away. The sunscreen came out of the medicine chest, as a moisturizer for cold-parched skin. An unusual keer-ing and a shaking in the branches led to a glimpse of a blue jay. Clouds eventually suppressed the light. The subway steps were spotted with rain in early afternoon—the evening showers had come on early, and without the evening warming trend. People were not dressed for this. At preschool pickup time the pavement was wet and the breeze was raw. By six, the chill had lifted. The gray clouds were full of unexpected little ripples, like fingerprint ridges, moving unexpectedly fast.

The Best Places to Get Free Coffee in LA

coffeeee From Sunset to Sun Valley, here are eleven of the city’s finest free coffee establishments.

1. Milt and Edie’s Drycleaners, Burbank

Milt and Edie’s, which has been open twenty-four hours a day since 1962, offers far more than just coffee: they have free cookies, free hot dogs and popcorn, free treats for your dog, free flag-cleaning, and on their website, a page of free fashion tips with confident headings like, “How Long Pants Legs Should Be.” The free coffee comes out of an automated machine set beside a plate of Hydrox cookies, both types, and under a bulletin board advertising local businesses, mostly dog walkers and dialect coaches.

2. Sunset Car Wash, West Hollywood

There was nothing I loved more when I was a little girl than going with my father to Sunset Car Wash on Sunset Boulevard, a low-slung Brutalist monument with an interior viewing window through which I’d watch our red Mercury Topaz slowly trundle through suds-covered tentacles. We referred to our car as “The Sharkmobile” because it would instantly overheat if you tried to stop or slow down. Then we’d have to pull over and my father would lift the hood and bang at the radiator with an old espadrille that we kept in the trunk specifically for that purpose. My father would pour himself a free coffee from a Mr. Coffee set into an alcove alongside an uncovered pitcher of cream and an open box of sugar cubes. I always begged for a sugar cube but my mother had forbidden my father to give me one because she’d heard somewhere that fiends would dose unattended sugar cubes with LSD just for kicks.

3. Emergency Room, Providence St. Joseph Medical Center, Burbank

I went to Providence St. Joseph Medical Center Emergency Room after my eight-month-old tumbled face-first off the kitchen counter and landed on his fortunately pliable eight-month-old nose, chipping his front tooth and severing the frenulum that once connected his upper lip to his gums. The free coffee is not located in the main emergency room waiting room with the vending machines and the TVs playing soap operas, nor in the triage area to which you will later be assigned to sit and chat about infant head trauma with a man who looks like Sting, but in a smaller subsequent waiting room in an area called, without apparent irony, Rapid Care. While drinking your coffee you can try to avoid eye contact with a room full of people who look perfectly fine to you and one person who definitely doesn’t, a gardener who sliced through his forearm on the job and is now standing with his arm wrapped in a jacket, his demeanor calm and slightly apologetic, like a man sorry for getting blood all over your perfectly nice waiting room.

Three and a half hours later the cheerful doctor assured me it’s all but impossible to break a baby’s nose (“at this stage it’s all cartilage”) and that most healthy American boys have torn their frenulums by the age of six; she should know, having two young sons of her own. The baby had no signs of brain injury, though she did recommendI check in on him every two hours overnight “to make sure he’s still breathing.”

The Not-Trump of the Lower East Side

Welcome to Surreal Estate, a column in which we explore listings and stories from the tumultuous New York City real estate market.

146 Orchard, 5B
$2,495/month
Studio
? square feet
Nearest subway: JMZ/F at Essex Street/Delancey Street

“The idea of this neighborhood is basically bars, restaurants, and art galleries,” Joe Safdie, an agent with Misrahi Realty, told me as we strolled through the Lower East Side on Wednesday afternoon. We were supposed to visit three apartments that he had listed, but one had rented the day before and one was already under contract. (He generally recommends that clients look at ten to twelve apartments over the course of two, maybe three days.) “Inventory moves pretty quickly.”

According to Streeteasy, the studio at 146 Orchard last rented in 2012 for $2,295 a month—an increase of two hundred dollars in two years. It’s a simple apartment—basically just a rectangle, with two big windows looking out the back of the building. I asked Safdie the square footage, but he demurred. “When it comes to rentals, I don’t like to quote square footage, because square footage can be very deceiving,” he said. “When it comes to buying, then it matters, because you’re actually paying for every square foot. When it comes to rentals, I always tell my clients, don’t ever focus on numbers with square footage, focus on what you need to put in, what you would like to fit in. Can you fit your bed, can you fit your couch, can you fit your TV?”