Friday, October 16th, 2009
45

"Smut, Please"! The Fabulous Online Universe of 'Twilight' Fan Fiction, in Which Edward and Bella Get It On and On and On

R PATSThe exhibition hall in downtown San Diego was divided by sex. By dawn on the second day of Comic Con-this was back in late July-the men figured out they were beat. Hundreds of young girls had spent the night camped out on the sidewalk and so they packed the first 50 rows of the 6000-seat convention room. The unmoving estrogen division-girls in plastic fangs, clingy tops and body glitter-sat patiently through the morning's promotional panels for disaster movies and action hero sagas. But the girls began to screech and jostle as their obsession approached: Twilight.

When the star of the young adult Twilight movie franchise, Robert Pattinson, finally took the stage, he was greeted by a swell of withering sighs.

When that panel's frenzy eventually climaxed and petered out, a smaller squadron of females emerged from the bubbling mass. Together, they rode the escalator to the second floor so that they could have their own conversation about the Twilight world's attendant online fan fiction. I went up the escalator expecting to sit in another room filled with gasping girlies. I was completely wrong.


* * *

We were given a rose-colored program with panelists' names and bios at the door. They all went by their online handles: Angstgoddess003, Hopey, Lolashoes, Psymom. The forces behind Twilight fan fiction are women over thirty. Many of them are mothers.

Dressed in tidy, modest clothing, these women were spending this late July weekend away from their jobs as store clerks, hospital administrators, scientists and homemakers to meet and mingle with a group of strangers who, like them, were all enthusiastic consumers and purveyors of smut.

Smut is their playful nickname, given to X-rated fan-authored fiction pieces (Twilight fan fictions are called Twi-Fic or fandoms). The biggest Twi-Fic fan site is called Twilighted. It's a 60,000-member online community that, they said at the panel, gets three million unique hits a month. It was founded in March, 2008. The site, according to its tag line, is dedicated to 'All-Inclusive, High-Quality Fan Fiction.'

The top titles of the website have included: The List (a 78,890 word novelization of all the places the teenage couple of the series will have sex after they marry), The Office (an X-rated hybrid version of the NBC show, wherein Dunder Mifflin is staffed by vampires). There is a nine-part series named Edward and Bella's Sex Anthology. Here's a passage from The Office:

"Very, very bad move," he seethed through his teeth. Placing his hands on my shoulders, he looked into my eyes and slid the fabric to the floor. His hands took mine, turning me around, bringing them up and pressing my palms against the wall…. His touch left a spark of electricity all the way down my back, over every inch of skin he touched. I felt his hands grab my ass and squeeze, his breath hot and heaving in my ear. "Very naughty girl."


I yelped out in surprise as I felt his hand come hard against my ass, and my only response was a moan of pleasure. What the fuck was he doing to me? I would never do these things. Yet here I was, panting heavily at his rough touch. I breathed in another sharp gasp as his hands clasped the scant material on my ass and yet again, ripped it off.

These women edit stories, write reviews, judge writing contests, host podcasts, and have five conventions planned in the course of a year. The stories range from traditional romance plots (a cabin, a fireplace, a hot tub, general yearning) to ecstasy-fueled threesomes in college dorm rooms. Sites like Twilighted have filled a space on the internet that no publishing house ever could. They dodge copyright laws and taboos about teen sex. Also they do it for free.

And the leaders of Twilighted are trying to thread an extremely narrow needle. Nobody wants to get rid of the smut, because that's where the audience is. But no one really wants to talk about the smut either.


* * *

Twilight is not about vampires; it's a love story, a bodice ripper for tweens about the forbidden love between a killer and a shy girl. At the center is Edward, a 108-year old vampire housed in the exquisite body of a teenager. Though he harbors some Victorian notions about chastity and women, he also embodies the timeless qualities of a romantic lead: he is protective, mysterious and lusty.

Bella, a human in high school, has some quirks-she's klutzy and sarcastic-but really she acts as an unthreatening stand-in for the reader's affair with Edward. Most of the fan fictions on Twilighted are devoted to the sex life of Bella and Edward. (Sex between Rob and Kristen runs into legal trouble.) Many follow a general pattern: a slow build to the couple's first-usually forbidden-sexual encounter, a Bella masturbatory session, some explosive sex scenes, reflections about the nature of love and then more rapacious sex scenes.

Twilighted grabs hold of the Stephenie Meyer franchise and turns it inside out: sex, the rough and forbidden sort, which is the novel's subtext or denied desire, becomes the main focus of the writing. The fact that the characters involved are vampires is just a useful device.


* * *

Psymom, the founder and chief administrator of Twilighted, sat at the center of the panel. She's a plump red-head in her late 30s with a cropped Kate Gosselin cut and a candy-coated voice. The seven other authors on the panel show her deference, and the audience praises her with hoots.

Psymom and friendsDuring the TwiFic panel, Psymom skirted the sexual nature of the site. It's unclear if this is intentional dodging or just shyness-it would be reasonable to assume that someone who has made her fame in an anonymous online community dedicated to erotica could wilt before a crowd. In her introduction, Psymom plugged new aspects of the website that "have nothing to do with Twilight," such as published romance authors hosting workshops on writing, as well as non-Twilight-related fiction contests. But the crowd seemed uninterested in Twilighted's new ventures. The questions and the conversation stick to one topic: how can readers transcribe their own Twilight fantasies into compelling fiction?

Over a speaker phone, a voice asked Psymom, "Do you have any regrets or lessons learned by conceiving Twilighted?"

"I have no regrets, it has been the most amazing-" her voice cracked and she put the pads of her fingertips below her eyes, so her makeup wouldn't smudge. An audience member yelled out, "We love you, Psymom."

Shortly after the panel, I contacted Psymom to see if she'd be willing to discuss her website and the Twi-Fic world. She was delighted. I also contacted eight other popular Twilighted authors and administrators. All were happy to talk. In the course of one week and three emails, however, all were instructed not to go on record with me and a "message" was passed on from an attorney. "With participation at this level, including that you may want to use direct quotes, Twilighted would need final approval before publication to the extent it involves any input from our perspective," Psymom wrote in an email.

Two authors contacted me and said they'd be willing to be interviewed anonymously. And one actually agreed to talk.


* * *

"I'm a pervert," Becca Shear told me.

Becca is one of the top-ten most-read writers on Twilighted. Her series 'Smut, Please' remains of the 'most favorited' series on the site.

"I cuss like a sailor, I like the kinkier stuff," she said.

Becca is a 25-year-old nursing student who divides her days between school and working in the medical records office at a hospital in Phoenix. Becca has been a fan fiction writer for close to four years.

"I used to write about magic," she said. She got her start writing PG-13 fan fiction about Harry Potter. "It was tedious," she said, "because I had to come up with new spells all the time. "

We speculated about the fuzzy line between porn and erotica, and what exactly drives thousands of women to write and read Twilight smut. Becca believes it has to do with details.

"Smut, to me, is like the girl version of porn," Becca said. "Like, I'm a girl! I want details. I want a backstory! Watching two people have sex devoid of context gets kinda boring pretty quickly."

Becca is not prudish about old-fashioned video porn; she likes it. But she finds herself more titillated by serialized sex. "I like the tease!" Becca said. "I want to be seduced. Tell me about what you want to do me. That's so much more exciting."

Becca has created her own raunchy narrative using the characters and concepts from Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series but she has little loyalty to the Meyers canon. In 'canon' Twi-Fic, the characters follow the same romantic lines as they do in the book: heterosexual, single partner, couples like Edward and Bella. All of Becca's stories have the tag "AU," for alternate universe. In Becca's universe, partners swap, get a little queer and have sex in Manhattan publishing houses and elite college classrooms.

There is a splinter faction of Twilighted members who disapprove of AU. Some have taken to trolling the message boards and comment sections and castigating authors of Alternate Universe smut for defiling the series.

What remains a constant theme from 'the canon' to AU fan-fic is the element of restraint. In the Meyers series, Edward refuses to have sex with Bella because the taste of her naked skin would arouse his homicidal vampiric instincts. So when things get hot and heavy between the young duo, Edward will break away. This creates a (really quite steamy) cat and mouse game that unwinds over four books.

In several fictions, Edward is recast as Bella's unimpressed professor or her undermining but ravishing co-worker or-my personal favorite-her dreamy doctor. In a story Becca co-authored, A Tale of Two Edwards, Bella gets caught in sex triangle between the Cullen twins (this is a Becca's own twist on the story; there is only one Edward Cullen in the original Twilight). One twin is cold and irresistible. The other is sentimental and chaste. Bella cannot have both-but oh how she wants to! This scene takes place in a wine cellar:

Opening my eyes, I found Cullen watching me, his face fixed on mine, watching me writhe beneath his touch. It was torture. The look in his eyes-lust, want, need-was all there, and it was almost enough to make me uncoil. Not wanting to waste the moment, I grabbed his face within my hands and said three little words. I knew it was all wrong, but all right all at the same time.


"Fuck me, Edward."


Cullen stared at me incredulously as the words tumbled out of my mouth. However, his shocked expression was soon replaced with a look of pure desire and need.

This "fuck me" meme is common in fan-fic. At some point Bella insists that Edward break through whatever professional, ethical and/or supernatural barrier prevents their lovemaking. I asked Becca if she thinks the older readers and writers of Twilighted are scandalized by it.

"No," Becca said. "It's the teenagers. They ruin it. Younger readers want you to stick the story. The moms and older set of Twilighted are more sexually adventurous."

The moms, said Becca, enjoy the sexual spontaneity of her fiction because they've "seen it all before." But Becca has shied away from becoming too involved in the website because the older ladies tend to act "cliquish" and also tend to take smut "way too seriously."


* * *

Psymom says she works as a research psychologist. Her skittishness regarding being written about is not surprising-it's not uncommon for people who run Internet communities to have a healthy and well-earned fear of outside attention.

But Twilighted is one these amazing user-driven corners of the Internet where the porn is literary and operated for and by women. This is rare; it deserves attention. And as the fandom swells in size and the possibility of monetizing this massive community becomes more likely, it's also possible that those sitting on top may be getting even more squeamish.

The day before our scheduled interview, I received an email from Psymom. She wrote, in part: "When reviewing the interview questions you sent to my staff and me, and seeing that the focus of those questions appears to be directed solely to sexually explicit fanfiction stories, I am troubled."

She also wrote: "I spent some time researching some of your work. Unfortunately, that raised some concerns on my part. Many of your articles seem to be focused on opinion-based commentary designed to tantalize your readers by denigrating the subject of the article."

Psymom did agree to answer questions about her website by email. Her answers included:

Q. What crosses the line from 'smut' to 'pornography'?
A. As with art, it is in the eye of the beholder.

Q. Do you feel like your work is subversive (i.e. sexualizing a teenage romance?) Given the fact that Stephenie Meyer is Mormon and one of the main themes of the book is chastity.
A. The overall theme of the books is love-it is a love story about a couple that falls in love, gets married, and has a child despite the adversities they must face.

Q. How do writers and readers react to gay story lines?
A. People read and write what interests them.

Throughout our correspondence, Psymom insisted that I just didn't get it. She explained that Twilight fan fiction was a huge genre and that what she called "adult" pieces only make up a minority of the fanfiction content. She said that there is nothing naughty or subversive in fantasizing about a married couple (Bella and Edward get hitched in the fourth book).

There are only two stories on Twilighted with "Psymom" as the author. (Her piece "Stranger than Fiction" was taken down "for legal reasons," she has explained on the site.) One of these two remaining pieces is about Rob Pattinson and Kristen Stewart, just after they are cast in Twilight.

In the story, Rob calls Kristen the day before they shoot their first scene, in which the director will have them kiss. She is staying at the Four Seasons in L.A., and he comes by and picks her up in a silver Volvo, just like the character in the books. In the car, they listen to Debussy. They find an Italian place in Long Beach. "'Be with you in a moment…' said a very flamboyant guy with a nametag that said 'Marcus.' He was flipping through a copy of the National Enquirer and didn't seem eager to be interrupted." Then the waiter is overcome with his fandom for Pattinson.

Over dinner, the two actors plan to make out in the car-but decide to save their burning passion for the screen. "Method acting, remember?" Rob says to Kristen.

Her other story is about the characters Edward and Bella. "In honor of your birthday, Rob, I have written some 'Human Edward/Bella' smut…yeah, that's what we'll call it…" she wrote in the introduction. It contains this sentence: "As I slid my hand back down his shaft, I lowered to my knees and let my tongue make the next ascent."

The reviews were good-terrific, in fact.

"I had to take a cold shower after reading this, it was soo good!" wrote Kayleigh, signing her review "xx."

"I was undone from the first line–just imagining that ass!" wrote Laura Cullen. "Kudos!"

45 Comments / Post A Comment

Moff (#28)

"Many of your articles seem to be focused on opinion-based commentary designed to tantalize your readers by denigrating the subject of the article."

Man, she sums up this corner of the Internet better than I've seen just about anybody do. (Although I hasten to add that the Awl is much less guilty of it than certain other sites.)

beingiseasy (#1,735)

I've been completely out of the Twilight loop up until last night when a friend gave me a basic overview. Now, today I read this and am confounded even more. Great piece, well researched and really fascinating stuff.

HiredGoons (#603)

"Watching two people have sex devoid of context gets kinda boring pretty quickly"

Shut up, Becca.

Becca is has refined tastes and level of kink that two people porking just can't live up to! We should all be so lucky.

xshear (#1,955)

xoxo. we all need to be caressed.

Mary HK Choi (#1,469)

AWESOME. Also, where my Edward Cullen x Jacob Black Yaoi fanfic at? Needs it.

Working on a Xanga entry about tentacle porn right now!

Abe Sauer (#148)

God.

Abe, will you be my fan fiction cabin consultant?

Abe Sauer (#148)

Um. Sounds gay. Is that like the log cabin Republicans?

lolaphilologist (#1,953)

Yikes! This article has a lot of errors in it, I'm afraid. "The Office" has no vampires in it at all, for a start. Writing about the All Human Twific phenomenon could be a fascinating article in itself. I won't list all the errors, but there are enough for a serious re-write, IMO.

Please send me an email at notes@theawl.com. I can help!

There is a very long academic thesis I read to prepare for this piece. It's about the beginnings of slash. It's called: ' "One index finger on the mouse scroll bar and the other on my clit" : Slash writers' views on pornography, censorship, feminism and risk." '

http://ir.lib.sfu.ca/dspace/handle/1892/8734

But, you know, the title doesn't roll off the tongue. And it's all about Star Trek. Vamp sex > Vulcan Sex.

Kataphraktos (#226)

You do realize you are about to be sucked into the event horizon of a singularity, right?

Crunchbird (#1,002)

Wow, this is a fairly ridiculous article in the longstanding genre of, "isn't slash-fic wacky, and isn't it amazing that it's written by adult women" pieces that have been appearing since roughly the early 1980s. At the very least I would have expected NVC to have seen the whole raft of articles like this that came out about Harry Potter fanfic and avoid the same, sad cliches and wide-eyed astonishment at the notion that otherwise normal, boring women write and enjoy erotica based on existing media properties.

Given the fact that you focused almost the entire piece on the 'smut' angle, and wrote it as if no one else had written the exact same article a dozen or more times before, I think that Psymom and her cohorts' decision to avoid engaging with you further was probably the right one. As someone with her own relatively ridiculous book deal based on an exaggerated obsession with pop culture, I would think you'd be a little more sensitive to their concerns.

CB! Why so fussy? Twilight is a new phenom is and it has spurred this super interesting community that hasn't been around since the 80's! Topicality, hooray.

Also, I would invite you to point out what pieces on Twilighted that rank in the top 10 that are not smutty. The site is devoted to smut — and rightfully so! It's hot. Maybe you can explain to the lovely Awl readers why the ladies are so bashful about this point because it still confuses me. Not to be bossy or anything but embrace it, is what I say. And I gave every one a pretty fair shake here, didn't I?

Downloading my new Twi-gasm podcast now! :)

efc (#1,956)

It's too bad you didn't actually read the stories listed in the top ten lists. There are quite a few that are NOT smut stories as you refer to them. Yes, the site has its share of erotic stories, but it also has some great stories that are not centered around sex.

In fact, the #1 story, has no sex in it at all. "Trust in Advertising."
There are others on those lists as well. It’s about half and half.

So instead of jumping on the smut wagon, maybe you should have researched your facts a little better. It's no wonder psymom and the staff of Twilighted didn't feel comfortable talking to you. You would have twisted anything they would have added to this article.

If you want people to embrace it, maybe you shouldn't denigrate to what you have.

schuylerdade (#1,976)

I hate to burst your bubble, but slash never went away. There's been a continuous, evolving community since the early 80s. (Checking out the sites for the major slash conventions would have revealed that.) Interest in Trek may have waned, but slash is about the people involved, who they are and where their community lies. Just as sci-fi geeks didn't all crawl into a hole when the Star Wars prequels were done and fantasy fans didn't die with Robert Jordan.

Also, fanfiction doesn't have to be smutty. In fact, a lot of writers and readers abhor explicit sex. With such a polarizing label, I would be much more cautious about painting with so wide a brush.

I have not read any of these other articles of which you speak, however, much to my sadness, as I would have enjoyed reading them also.

Abe Sauer (#148)

I remember hearing about this a little back in the Lord of the Rings release days. But wasn't that some spoof Sam's Diary? But apparently the genre is… ahem… broad
http://ask.metafilter.com/105574/Does-Obama-McCain-slash-fiction-exist

Also, Crunchbird, I 100% understand your concerns. I do think that to even write about any (sub)culture for a readership that isn't of that culture it won't even mater what you write. Psymom seems to have nailed that (painfully well) and it's my opinion that the piece at least should get credit for including that.

Finally, I am supportive of this if only because it involves original reporting on the web where a person TALKED to somebody else and managed to leave the apt to find out about something. And I hope this does not come across as Awl writers being defensive jerks and having one another's backs own blah blah blah…

Eeek something is up with my fill in (with the double "is/has" problem) but, I mean, clearly, any one can see from my typo free copy that I'm a super-tight writer. Super tight = nvc.

HiredGoons (#603)

"In Becca’s universe, partners swap, get a little queer and have sex in Manhattan publishing houses and elite college classrooms."

Becca's alt-verse is my…actual…verse?

HG– pics or it didn't happen.

HiredGoons (#603)

You're sassy! I like you!

Dr. Spaceman (#1,211)

A reticent pornographer? That's a rare beast.

The Top Ten Most Favorite Stories:

Trust in Advertising: No Rating (didn't read this one)
The Office by tby789 Rated: NC-17
The List by Laura Cullen Rated: NC-17
Snowed In Rated: NC-17
Hiding in Plain Sight by limona Rated: NC-17
Never Sleep in a Strange Man's Bed by WndrngY Rated: NC-17
Seducing Ms Swan by Rialle New! Rated: PG-13 (fluff is great too!)
Nothing Left to Lose by SarahJayne Rated: NC-17
Innocent, Vigilant, Ordinary by Oxymoronic8 Rated: NC-17

Hiding in Plain Sight is a personal fave!

lempha (#581)

Not really sure how this is being perceived as an attack on Twific, specifically because it made me want to read Twific. And I've not even read Twilight or seen the movie!

We love it! Choire wants dress up as Slutty Edward for Halloween!

Sharpless (#1,957)

Brilliantly written article, Natasha. I mean that. Very well done, and not unnecessarily snarky, which is how most corners of the Internet would handle it. Good read. Even if I don't agree with, nor even understand, a group of people, it's fascinating to catch a glimpse of the world they live in.

Kataphraktos (#226)

In the Star Trek fanfic universe*, it is well known that the best work far outdoes the writing done for the shows and movies, let alone the "official" Star Trek books.

I suspect the same is, or soon will be, the case for Twific.

* Don't be a snob! Geeks have needs, too!

OMG you're right. *shame beams.*

AngstGoddess003 (#1,959)

"We were given a rose-colored program with panelists’ names and bios at the door. They all went by their online handles: Angstgoddess003, Hopey, Lolashoes, Psymom. The forces behind Twilight fan fiction are women over thirty. Many of them are mothers."

The inaccuracies just go downhill from there. I'm quite a bit younger than thirty, as were many other panelists. The light that you painted the panel in was, quite frankly, a little insulting. Many of us never discussed smut, many are known for stories in which smut isn't a prevalent factor, and yet I can't help feeling as though many of the items presented in regards to the panel and fanfiction were very self-serving to your personal beliefs. I'm not a member of the Twilighted staff, and I suppose, as such, was never contacted by anyone in reference to a discussion, which I would certainly have offered in light of your very skewed interpretation of the panel I happened to have participated in.

Nevertheless, you surely can't blame PsyMom for her reluctance to encourage the entirely opinionated and somewhat inaccurate representation you intended to convey here.

Mindpowered (#948)

Oh get over yourself. I'm sure there is plenty of G material as well, but you've missed the point.

As this article makes clear (and quite similar to other fanfics) sexuality is strong undercurrent. In fact the strong sexuality is one of the few common threads between various fanfics, and as such is worthy of journalistic investigation.

Moreover, you're assuming this article is somehow mocking your obsession, but she's actually being very sensitive about it. This could have been far more damning and hysterical but it isn't.

You complete me, MP.

TrilbyLane (#1,318)

But writers are allowed to be opinionated and have personal beliefs! So she chose to write on the smut element… why not? Maybe she found that bit the most interesting, especially as Twilight is so focused on chastity and self-denial…?

Natasha, I wonder if you've read Annie Proulx's thoughts on the fanfiction that has grown around Brokeback Mountain. She talks about it in the current issue of the Paris Review. She's furious about it: 'Those characters belong to me by law!'

I read Annie Proulx's sour grapes piece on the oscars! But haven't seen the fan fiction piece. I could totally sympathize with an author, who has spent the time agonizing about what is 'in' or 'out of character' for these people she's created, to see them thrown into all kind of wild situations. But I think that it's ultimately incredibly flattering right? The idea that you've created such indelible characters that people need to continue living with them.

Annie, she's so silly!

hannah1alexander (#1,963)

It's always such a shock to me to read articles like this where everyone is pretty much "OH MY! Women write fan fiction! Some of it is called slash! Oh oh oh! How new!" because I tend to forget that there are so many, what we used to call "Mundanes" out there.

Way back that was the fannish nickname for those who had/have no idea there is the whole fanfic culture and that there are a LOT of people, mostly women, in it and what they write cover a pretty enormous spectrum. This article on Twilight fic is like finding an article where someone announces with great excitement that there are people who like to eat food.

I like reading articles about food!
I also prefer the name 'Muggle'.

TrilbyLane (#1,318)

It is certainly annoying when people disseminate information on a subject. Everyone should know everything already. This afternoon I intend to stand outside a library and spit on anyone who is taking a book out.

punkthis (#243)

So when do we start seeing The Awl fan fiction?

Choire picked up Luke Mazur in his silver volvo. "Did you see that thing I wrote about that internet site today?" asked Luke, in his boyish, husky lilt. "I did", replied Choire, in his polished, oaken purr. "It had three factual errors and two spelling errors, so I'm cutting your bonus this month." They drove on in strained silence. As they approached the fancy-dress orgy at Moff's fabulous Motthaven loft, each wondered if there was a practicable way to get Moff alone to inquire discreetly about work/live spaces in the neighbourhood, or would he be all over Mary HK Choi, as usual. "He couldn't cut a piece of that if he shot Calpico from his…", murmured Luke, sulkily. "Hm?", intoned Choire from around a mouthful of smooth, unfiltered Menthol Balkan Sobranie."

SarahBella (#1,974)

As both a reader and proud purveyor of smut, I wanted to point out the following. Just because many of the stories on the top ten most reviewed list are smut, does not mean that most stories are smut.

Smut is a good thing. It's self expression at it's most verbally graphic. Fanfic was created because we wanted to bend our favorite characters to our will.

When an author requests that we not write fanfic about their characters, as Anne Rice has, we respect that.

The first time you read smut you think, "Ooh, this is wrong, I shouldn't be reading this". The second time you read smut you think, "This is so wrong, I can't stop reading this". The third time you read smut, you're hooked.

Not every branch of smut is for everyone. There is some hardcore BDSM out there, slash is every where, and why not?

We write what feels good, even if it's dirty.

PS – SarahBella is my penname at both Twilighted and fanfiction.net.

SB! I have a question. And I don't mean this rhetorically, when some one like Rice asks that people don't fiddle around with her characters, why obey that request? I have a divided opinion on the matter and would like your input.

Twilightmex (#3,918)

Hi sorry for writting thru this but I am going crazy to get a copy of the office by tby789 if you have one that you could email me please !!! flor.silva@gmail.com I will really appreciate it !!!

myoriginalintent (#10,322)

Seriously? You just have to google to figure out why people skitter away from writing Anne Rice fanfiction– she'll bring out the lawyers. In a larger sense, though, a fanfiction writer loves the fiction he or she is using as a jumping off point, and loves the author of the original fiction for creating it. If someone you loved told you to fuck off, what would you do: say fuck you too, and go find someone else, or say nahnahnah you don't love me but I'm going to do this because it annoys the crap out of you? Fanfic writers don't exist in a vacuum that denies the existence of the original author, and it's not that hard to jump ship and switch fandoms. If JK Rowling hated fanfic, I as a writer would've gone somewhere that the author would at least pretend we didn't exist.

http://www.angelfire.com/rant/croatoan/
http://www.darkpowerthesite.com/thoughts/current.php
http://encyclopediadramatica.com/Anne_Rice#MAJOR_FUCKING_NEWS

Post a Comment